Whole30 Recap – Week 2 and Meal Plan – Week 3

24 Jan

We are about halfway through our Whole30 journey!

Week 2 was all about settling into our new routine, which by this point is very much a routine. We haven’t hit the stereotypical rut of eggs for breakfast every morning or protein + vegetable + potato for dinner every night. But we do miss some of our old convenience foods.

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Here’s how Week 2 shaped up for us:

  • We’re still snacking. We both do better, mentally and physically, if we eat a little something every few hours.
  • I’m still drinking 88 to 96 ounces of water, which I believe helps curb my hunger and desire to snack. I slacked a little on the weekend, with just 64 ounces, and I felt more hungry that day.
  • My emotions were very fragile this week. Monday morning, Christopher took the girls to Wee Care at the Y; the staff thought she had a fever. That evening, I brought them back, and the staff sent us home because their policy states children must be fever-free for 24 hours before they may return to Wee Care. I just sobbed–flat-out sobbed–for a good 5 minutes in the parking lot, and then much of the drive home.Was that Whole30 talking? Tuesday afternoon, the girls were full-blown sick–coughing badly and frequently–and I panicked and broke down in tears that I might again miss my workout. Christopher came home for an hour so I could teach my yoga class. I would have been a mess without it. And I know I would have emotionally eaten to make myself feel better.
  • I successfully avoided major temptations Tuesday. It was the pastor’s birthday (I work at a church) First thing in the morning, I brought him a hazelnut latte, and I got myself an Americano. I would have killed for a latte (frothy milk is life!) and a scone. Later that morning, someone brought cupcakes from the local cake shop, and I passed on them multiple times. I would have killed for one of those, too. And then regretted the sugar crash later.
  • I’m still figuring out how much to eat and when to eat it when it comes to more intense workouts. I got very lightheaded and nauseous at the end of our team workout Wednesday.
  • We successfully ate out for lunch Saturday. We went to IKEA and Woodfield Mall. We did a little research and found that Macy’s offers a build-your-own salad bar in their Marketplace. But we found no salad bar; Macy’s only has that on weekdays. We thought our only other option was Subway, otherwise we would have had to pick off cheese and other noncompliant items from salads at nicer restaurants. But we landed at Kin Fork, a barbeque/steakhouse-type restaurant, where we decided we would order naked burgers and veggie sides. We both had an 8-ounce burger grilled and wrapped in lettuce with onions for me and grilled jalapenos for Chris; I had broccolini on the side, and Chris had Brussels sprouts with balsamic glaze. We now know why they suggest just abstaining from eating out, but we also learned it is do-able. It was tasty and, because we were hangry and impatient, satisfying, but at the same time, it was not nearly as fulfilling as a typical restaurant experience.

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Recipe wins from last week:

(Italics denote the recipe is from the Whole30 book.)

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And here’s our meal plan for Week 3:

 

Breakfasts

Lunches

Dinners

(Italics denote the recipe is from the Whole30 book.)

We are 51 percent of the way through this little experiment! How are you feeling?

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Whole30 Recap – Week 1 and Meal Plan – Week 2

16 Jan

Whole30 Week 1 is a wrap!

Week 1 was all about adjustment: adjusting to a strict diet, adjusting to an increased consumption of meat, adjusting to a decreased consumption of sugar, adjusting to being hungry, adjusting to thinking about why we’re eating what and when we’re eating it.

I don’t know that I’ve ever thought so much about food in my life…

First, some confessions:

  • We ate a couple of non-compliant foodstuffs: nuts roasted in peanut oil, breakfast sausage with sugar, and bacon cured in sugar. My rationale was that a) we were not eating those non-compliant foods in any sort of quantity and b) we are not able to find 100% compliant foods as easily and within our budget in our area, so we were going to do the best we could with what was available, if not already in our pantry and refrigerator.
  • We snacked. A lot. And we snacked after dinner, before bed, a few times. We didn’t re-create treats with compliant ingredients, as is a big-time no-no on the program. But we did eat a snack.

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A day of eats: sweet potato, Brussels sprouts and sausage breakfast casserole; pear and roasted nuts; sweet potato and cauliflower chili; raw nuts; apple-pecan spiced chicken with roasted asparagus; hard-boiled egg

 

And now some thoughts:

  • I’m drinking 88 to 96 ounces of water, which I believe helps curb my hunger and desire to snack.
  • I need to stay busy, especially when the girls are napping in the afternoon, so I don’t mindlessly eat (even if I am making wise choices). We watched a lot of documentaries after dinner this week, and we found that intellectual stimulation helpful in curbing our desire to snack, too.
  • We didn’t get the “carb flu” as much as we expected. I felt a little lightheaded and nauseous on Day 2, but I think I was truly hungry, because I ate breakfast and felt infinitely better.
  • We also didn’t experience the “kill all the things” rage as suggested by the Whole30 timeline. We were irritable or quicker to anger, but I think that has little to do with the diet and more to do with real-life frustrations.
  • Christopher experienced some of the fatigue and malaise that comes with the end of Week 1. That said, we’re both sleeping much, much better than before. We’re not waking up feeling incredibly refreshed, but we’re falling asleep faster, and sleeping more deeply than before.
  • I didn’t have any major or prolonged cravings, except for peanut butter and graham crackers Wednesday and beer and chocolate over the weekend. The craving Wednesday was very fleeting, as was the craving over the weekend, honestly. I think my willpower is very strong. Christopher’s is, too. I’m so proud of how well he’s doing and how seriously he’s taking this program.
  • We both cheated and weighed ourselves this week. We both were down 6 pounds.

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Recipe wins from last week:
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And here’s our meal plan for Week 2:

Breakfasts

Lunch

Dinner

(Italics denote the recipe is from the Whole30 book.)

How are you doing? Are you already experiencing some non-scale changes to your life?

Whole30 Meal Plan – Week 1

5 Jan

Christopher (who agreed to do the Whole30 with me!) and I planned our breakfasts, lunches, and dinners for the first two weeks of our Whole30.

Here’s what we’re going to eat in Week 1:

Breakfasts

Lunch

Dinner

(Italics denote the recipe is from the Whole30 book.)

We plan to have fruit and nuts for snacks, if necessary. We’re also going to have frozen fruit, spinach, and almond milk on hand for green smoothies for pre- and post-workout fuel.

What’s on your Whole30 menu?

I’m doing the Whole30

3 Jan

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I need a reset.

I eat pretty clean most of the time, but naturally, I slack off on clean eating and workouts after big races and, like most people, around the holidays.

I felt like I was going through the motions: planning healthy meals, going to the gym, tracking everything in MyFitnessPal. I let it all slip the week leading up to Christmas and now the week in between Christmas and New Year’s.

And I’m OK with that. I believe we all need short periods of time away from the rigid tracking, the strict workouts, and even the semi-clean meals.

But I need a reset. I need to tame my sugar monster and my snack dragon. I need to amp up my workouts again. I need to be better about drinking enough water.

I want to reinvent my relationship with food. I want to clear up my skin. I want to get rid of my somewhat chronic (of late) bloating.

The Whole30 is the answer.

What is it?

The Whole30 is a 30-day clean-eating plan designed to clean up your diet and reset your cravings by cutting out foods that might be having a negative impact on your health: sugar, grains, legumes, dairy, and alcohol.

So what can you eat?

Lots and lots of protein, vegetables, and (healthy) fat. And coffee. Black coffee is allowed. (Halle-freakin’-lujah!)

And what can’t you eat?

No sugar, not even the natural stuff, and especially, no artificial sweeteners. No grains, not even the ancient ones. No beans or legumes, which means no peanuts, peanut butter, or chickpeas. No soy either. No dairy. No alcohol. No processed foods.

 

 

The Whole30 has some legit benefits–that come from eliminating, then carefully reintroducing foods that commonly cause a lot of health problems and from rebuilding your relationship with food. Consider these:

Weight loss, fewer headaches, fewer digestive problems, clearer skin, more energy, better workouts, improved sleep, fewer cravings, and a better relationship with food (i.e. more knowledge of the foods that make us feel like crap).

The Whole30 prohibits weighing yourself and tracking your calories. Its focus is on feeling good–like really, truly good–from the inside out.

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Ordinarily, I am not one to advocate for diets (or even whole lifestyles) that completely eliminate entire food groups (i.e. grains, dairy), unless it is for a specific health reason (e.g. Celiac disease, lactose intolerance). But I am fine with cleanses that last for a specific and reasonable amount of time (i.e. 30 days) and are done correctly — no shakes or supplements, just real food, quality meals, in satisfying quantities.

My friend Mindy and I, along with our incredible group at Healthy Living Blogs, are hosting a Whole30 that runs from Jan. 9 to Feb. 7.

You’ve got just enough time to prepare, and you’ll wrap up just before Valentine’s Day, so you can celebrate without feeling restricted.

We hope you’ll join us. We’ll have a private Facebook group, where participants can check in as frequently or infrequently as desired, share recipes and meal ideas, share struggles and non-scale victories, ask questions, and above all, find support and accountability. We also have a hashtag, #hlbwhole30, that you can use on social media, to help us all stick together.

Join me?

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Merry Christmas

25 Dec

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Race recap: Milwaukee Running Festival Marathon

16 Dec

It has been more than a month since Christopher and I ran the Milwaukee Running Festival marathon…

I thought I might just skip this recap. But I know I would be remiss if this recap wasn’t here in the archives.

So, here it is, abbreviated and completely from memory!

First, some notes:

My training went pretty well until about the final month.

I started getting sick Oct. 1 and cut a scheduled long run of 18 miles down to 12 miles. I felt well enough to tackle 20 miles a week later, but I experienced aches and pains through most of the run, especially from Mile 13.5 and on. I slogged through a step-back run of 13 miles Oct. 15, again with aches and pains, mostly in my left IT band. I tackled another 20 miles a week later, tired and ready to be done with training.

I started feeling really sore and fatigued the next day. I thought it was related to the long run, but I soon developed a nasty, productive cough, along with other symptoms that persisted for two weeks. I went into the doctor the Tuesday of race week to see if she could give me anything to knock it out in time for the marathon. She diagnosed me with near-pneumonia and prescribed a Z-pack of antibiotics.

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And now, the recap:

I toed the starting line feeling decent, but extremely nervous. I had not run in 2 weeks, and I had barely worked out other than my regular yoga classes and one BodyPump class. I went into it knowing it likely would be difficult, but hoping it would be wonderful after a couple of weeks of true rest for my legs.

I lined up with the 4:30 pace group and planned to stick with them as long as it felt comfortable to maintain that pace.

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Through the first several miles, I felt remarkably good. We were clocking a bit faster than our prescribed pace, but we were chatting and laughing, and I remained comfortable, so I just ignored it.

We headed north up Lincoln Memorial Drive, then back south 0n Lake Drive toward Brady Street. We ran across what is (unbeknownst to me) called the Marsupial Bridge past Lakefront Brewery and then down the brick Old World Third Street.

But around this point, I started to feel some tweaks in my knees and IT bands that, truthfully, never went away.

We ran West down Wisconsin Avenue, through the Marquette University campus, then north toward the Sherman Park neighborhood. The half marathoners turned around at the 9.5-mile mark, while the marathoners pressed on; the marathoners cross paths with each other from about Mile 11.5 to Mile 14.5 on an out-and-back stretch of Sherman Boulevard.

At about the halfway point, I started to incorporate more walking breaks. I tried to make it from aid station to aid station and just walk a bit longer leading up to and coming out of the stations.

We wound through Washington Park, then down Hawley Road toward the Miller Valley.

I saw my dad at the corner of Hawley and State, and I was sore and tired and I just threw my arms around him and lamented my pain and struggle. He told me to keep going, so I did.

The crowd of marathoners was really sparse by this point. It was very quiet and lonely, which is just terrible when you are struggling to keep your head above water.

We jogged past Miller Park and then joined the Hank Aaron State Trail for about a mile. We even did a lap around a football field just before Mile 21.

Around this point, a pair of girls sidled up along either side of me and asked if I wanted to walk and talk — and maybe run a little — with them. The three of us would go on to finish the race together, mostly walking the last 5 miles, complaining that the hills were brutal, that the course was long, that none of us was having a good race.

I saw my dad again at Mile 23 in the Third Ward.

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We pressed on past the Summerfest grounds, across Lakeshore State Park, then past Discovery World and the Milwaukee Art Museum before we finished in Veterans Park.

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Another marathon finish in the books. It wasn’t easy. It wasn’t pretty. It wasn’t my fastest. It wasn’t my slowest, either. (That title is reserved for my first one back in 2012.) But it was another marathon. And every single mile of the race and the training for it tells a story.

This just wasn’t my race. Maybe next year?

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It’s worth noting that the course was, in fact, almost a half-mile long. There were two errors, according to organizers, the first in the 17th mile and the second in the 20th mile. The exact amount of extra distance was 0.489583 miles. The organizers updated our times to reflect the added distance.

Distance: 26.7 miles
Duration: 5:27:03 (5:20:56 for 26.2)
Average pace: 12:14 per mile
Through 10K: 1:04:37
Through half: 2:20:59
Through 20 miles: 3:53:31

Race recap: Quad Cities Half Marathon

10 Oct

I’m back! And I have another (belated) race recap!

If you follow me on social media (my Instagram link is down and to the right on my sidebar), then you know I am training for another marathon — the Milwaukee Running Festival marathon Nov. 6. Christopher is training for it, too.

We wanted to work at least one half marathon into our training plan — just to give ourselves some incentive for logging all these miles, and to practice our race-day routines. We chose to return to the Quad Cities Half Marathon, a race we ran way back in 2012; it’s a well-organized race with a neat course and it’s only an hour from home.

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We were blessed cursed with unseasonably hot, humid weather, so Christopher and I agreed to go for our goal paces but let the chips fall where they might, given the conditions.

He lined up toward the 1:45 pace group, while I lined up closer to the 2:00 group. My friend and fellow fitness instructor, Andrea, who was running her first half marathon, lined up with me; we agreed to run together for as long as it made sense — if I wanted to and could go faster, then I would cruise on without her by my side.

Andrea and I ran together for maybe the first 2 to 3 miles before she hung back and I plodded ahead.

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I felt alright through the first half of the race. I was running at a consistent 9:30-9:45 pace, keeping my breathing in check and taking water and Gatorade at every aid station to stay hydrated given the climbing temperatures and bright sun overhead.

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Christopher waited for me (for 10 minutes!) at the halfway point, then we ran together for about 3 miles, along the river in Davenport and then across Government Bridge onto Arsenal Island. We separated at mile 11; Christopher was feeling like speeding up, having caught a wee bit of a second wind, while I was feeling like slowing down.

I was sore, but more than anything, I was just sapped of any get-up-and-go. I grabbed a piece of candy (sugar-coated gummy fruit slices–one of my favorites!) near the exit from the island, and I couldn’t even chew it because I was so tired.

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I ran my slowest miles (10:49 and 10:36, miles 12 and 13, respectively) on the island and then across the Moline Arsenal Bridge and back to downtown Moline. But I picked up the pace as much as possible through the final straightaway and clocked my fastest pace (9:24) to the finish.

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I breathed very rhythmically, in through my nose, out through my mouth over that last tenth of a mile. I crossed the finish line and got pulled over to the medical tent to sit down and slow my breathing, because it felt like every ounce of oxygen was caught up in my chest with nowhere to go.

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Christopher and I milled around the post-race party for a bit, grabbed some chocolate milk and then beer to refuel and celebrate another race–and a course PR! We waited for Andrea to finish, and then for a couple other friends to finish.

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Given the unseasonably brutal temperatures for a race, I was happy to have maintained an average of about 10 minutes per mile and finish only 7 minutes off my half-marathon best (and almost 15 minutes better for the course). It was just another marathon training run, just with aid stations along the way and a sweet medal at the end.

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Distance: 13.1 miles
Duration: 2:11:52
Average pace: 10:04 per mile